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Can I sleep in compression socks or sleeves?

Compression Sleeves

Compression socks and compression sleeves are amazing tools for recovery after an intense run, cycle, yoga session, or whatever your favorite workout is. Compression keeps your blood pumping to recovering muscle groups and clears away the lactic acid that causes soreness. But, NOT all compression socks and sleeves are designed for recovery, resting or sleeping. Let me explain...

First, let’s focus on compression sleeves. Compression leg sleeves or calf sleeves are similar to socks, but without the foot portion.  They come in a variety of compression levels. Zensah has a mild compression (around 15 mmHg) and CEP has a moderate level (around 20-30 mmHg).  Mild compression leg sleeves are great for wearing before you run, during your run and after. Moderate level compression sleeves should only be worn DURING your work out. The stronger level of compression is amazing for enhancing your performance, but it can actually cause foot swelling if you continue to wear it after your work out. The extra tight compression at your ankle can become a tourniquet, blocking blood flow from your ankle to your foot.  Bottom line: be careful to check your sleeve’s compression level before you use it for recovery.  These Zensah sleeves and these Core-Sport sleeves are perfect for recovery.

So, now you might ask – what about the moderate compression SOCKS you sell? Does compression level matter for those? Well, you CAN wear mild and moderate compression socks before, during and after your work out. Because socks have the foot portion attached, there’s no risk of foot swelling or cutting off circulation. Wear those bad boys all day long if you want.

Now - the most important question of all - can you sleep in your compression socks or sleeves? The answer is - No, not if you are a generally healthy person.  I know I’ve heard runners and athletes swear by sleeping in their compression socks before and after a big race day, but really it’s not safe.  Graduated compression is meant to be worn when you’re awake and moving around. It’s providing a constant amount of pressure to your circulatory system to fight gravity and pump that blood back to your heart. When you’re lying down, fully horizontal for a long period of time, your circulatory system doesn’t have to fight gravity. That pressure applied to your ankle and calf during the night can cut your circulation off. Now, some people do need to wear compression socks at night because of health issues or post-surgery. Even in these instances, you should only be wearing the lowest compression available (below 15 mmhg).  Do not wear your athletic compression socks and sleeves to bed – the compression level is too high.

If you have any questions, please let me know!

Brita on Google+

30 thoughts on “Can I sleep in compression socks or sleeves?”

  • Mary J.

    I am a senior and I have just started wearing
    compression socks (to knee.) Great article;
    answered a lot of my questions! Thank you!

    Reply
  • Virginia russell
    Virginia russell February 20, 2015 at 4:18 pm

    i have als and frequently have swollen ankles. Should I wear my compressiin stickings to bed

    Reply
    • Brita

      You should definitely speak with your doctor or physician to see if they recommend compression in bed. Most hospitals and doctor's offices won't recommend anything stronger than an 8-15 mmHg sock for use while sleeping, but your doctor's recommendation for your condition will be the best thing to follow.

      Reply
    • Esh

      I've recently had knee surgery and can't bend my leg but also have a large blood clot in that leg. I live alone and can't take the compression stockings off by myself. Should I hire someone to help me before I go to bed and when I get up? Or can I take them off every couple days for an hour or so and be okay?

      Reply
      • Brita Ericson

        Hi Virginia - This is definitely a question for your doctor since your doctor will know everything about your medical condition. If your doctor says you need to take them off, there are a bunch of tools you can use to help do that on your own. Check here: http://www.brightlifedirect.com/ACCESSORIES-Take-It-Off.asp

        Reply
  • Sharmaine De Leon
    Sharmaine De Leon March 4, 2015 at 7:12 am

    I have a friend who is paraplegeic (half paralyzed) so he cannot move nor feel any sensations on his legs. He or she has been having pitting edema because he or she prefers to sit the whole day. At night, he or she sleeps while sitting. My question is can I put his or her compression socks and leave it the whole day and night to reduce the edema?

    Reply
    • Brita Ericson

      Hi Sharmaine, I would definitely speak with a doctor about this. We have a few garments on our medical site that are designed for nighttime-wear that I think might help. These items are pricey, but could provide a lot of relief to your friend. A few to check out:
      Circaid Juxta-Fit – http://www.brightlifedirect.com/juxta-fit-essentials-lower-legging.asp
      BiaCare Chip Sleeve – http://www.brightlifedirect.com/biacare-chip-sleeve-bk.asp
      Tribute Garments – http://www.brightlifedirect.com/lymphedema-products-solaris-compression-garments-t.asp

      Unfortunately we do not work with insurance companies – your friend might be able to get these covered and refunded. They should definitely investigate! Please give us a call at 1-877-545-8585 if you have any additional questions.

      Reply
  • Lisa Van Aken

    I hust had vein ablation. Should i wear compression stockings to bed?

    Reply
    • Brita

      Hi Lisa - that's definitely a question for your doctor. They may recommend wearing TED hose or a light compression stocking. You can check out TED hose on our medical website here: http://www.brightlifedirect.com/OTHER-TED-Hose-Anti-Embolism.asp.

      Reply
  • Dani

    My doc wants me to wear compression socks for the day while up and around (I'm on my feet a lot) due to some issues with blood presure. Would sleeves work for this purpose?

    Reply
    • Brita

      Hi Dani - Yes, sleeves will help improve your circulation when you're on your feet. We just advise customers that if they have noticed their feet swelling recently, the sleeves might not be the best option. For foot and ankle swelling, full socks are a better choice. I know a lot of people who are on their feet for work and wear compression sleeves!

      Reply
  • Jennie

    What about the low compression socks that CEP has? Not the no show, but the once that come just above the ankle? Are they effective enough or are the knee high socks the best? I have having achilles tendon pain from running and know I will get shin splints as I get further along in my marathon training, Thank you!

    Reply
    • Brita Ericson

      Knee high socks are really the best for getting the full benefit of compression. I think you'll feel a real difference if you use them running and then put a recovery sock (anything in 15-20 mmHg) on afterwards. It's a bit to add to your routine, but the benefits might outweigh the hassle! Good luck with your marathon training!

      Reply
  • Ken

    I have neuropathy in both feet and my circulation seems to be worse when I am sleeping. Will wearing my compression socks interfere with my circulation problem?

    Reply
    • Brita Ericson

      Hi Ken - Thanks for your question. Unfortunately, I can't say for sure whether compression socks will interfere with your circulation or neuropathy. That's definitely a question for a medical professional! Sorry I can't be more helpful.

      Reply
  • Cynthia

    I just had surgery July 23, 2015 for a medial torn memiscus and I was wondering could I sleep in some compression stocking

    Reply
    • Brita Ericson

      Hi Cynthia, we generally don't recommend sleeping in compression socks as a rule. Talk to your surgeon or doctor to see what he/she says! A light compression sock in 10-15 mmHg might be safe for you to wear at night.

      Reply
  • Shirley wright

    My legs hurt at night so much that it keeps awake. Would Ted hose help to sleep in?

    Reply
    • Brita Ericson

      I'd recommend talking to your doctor about it - you may have something called Restless Leg Syndrome, which is very common. Some of our customers have told us that this condition has improved by wearing compression during the day.

      Reply
  • Glyn

    Hi Brita, I'm a runner and frequently suffer with swollen calf veins after speedy runs. Compression sleeves tend to help but more so at night. After wearing them to bed, my the swelling in my calves reduce significantly more than they do wearing them in the day. I've been doing this now for about 6 months and had no idea it was actually dangerous. I have a neoprene strap that also helps. Would this be safe if its not too tight? I find the body heat heat generated from the neoprene strap helps. Thanks

    Reply
    • Brita

      Hi Glyn, Everybody's body works differently - and if you have venous insufficiency, low compression at nighttime can be helpful. Have you tried wearing compression socks all day, or just during runs? I would suggest speaking with a doctor or medical professional about your swelling and use of compression at night to see what they recommend. If it seems to be working for you - that's great! We just suggest using caution with compression at nighttime.

      Reply
  • sabrina

    I've just injured my knee from jumping in martial arts, can I wear knee sleeves all day?

    Reply
  • Gordie

    Lactic acid is not the culprit behind muscle soreness, nor will wearing compression sleeves help flush lactic acid out. Your body does that on its own within the first 24 hours, after an intense workout. The muscle "soreness"you experience is caused by DOMS, which is inflammation from the micro tears in your muscles from your workout....

    Just thought your first paragraph was misleading and incorrect, thus, making this article moot.

    :(

    Reply
  • kas

    hi I have nocturnal cramps on my calfs. do you think compression socks will help with the cramps?

    thanks

    Reply
    • Brita Ericson

      Hi Kas - That's a good question to as your doctor or medical provider. You could certainly try wearing a light compression during the day time - no higher than 15-20 mmHg - and that might provide enough support that your muscles aren't strained by night-time. But we don't recommend wearing compression at night unless a doctor has approved it. Thanks!

      Reply
  • […] muscle containment to reduce fatigue and damage. Unlike most compression socks, 2XU socks are safe to sleep in, so if you're a runner that swears by sleeping in your socks, these breathable socks are a great […]

    Reply
  • Bernadette mampasi
    Bernadette mampasi September 9, 2016 at 5:46 pm

    Please how oftenly can I put on the sagvaris sick, for exp. 2hrs,or more on the particular day.

    Reply
  • Ethel RENA GRIFFIN
    Ethel RENA GRIFFIN September 23, 2016 at 6:22 am

    I wear Graduated cpmpression socks I am very a tive and my liwer leg on thexleft hurts,really bad and the compressi9n helps I can do my hip hop again. My scita nerve bothers me sometimes

    Reply
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